Tools

IPEye is a TCP port scanner that can do SYN, FIN, Null, and XMAS scans. It’s a commandline tool. IPEye probes the ports on a target system and responds with closed, reject, drop, or open. Closed means there is a computer on the other end, but it doesn’t listen at the port. Reject means a firewall is rejecting the connection to the port (sending a reset back). Drop means a firewall is dropping everything to the port, or there is no computer on the other end. Open means some kind of service is listening at the port. These responses help a hacker identify what type of system is responding.

IPSecScan is a tool that can scan either a single IP address or a range of addresses looking for systems that are IPSec enabled.

NetScan Tools Pro, hping2, KingPingicmpenum, and SNMP Scanner are all scanning tools and can also be used to fingerprint the operating system (discussed later).

Icmpenum uses not only ICMP Echo packets to probe networks, but also ICMP Timestamp and ICMP Information packets. Furthermore, it supports spoofing and sniffing for reply packets. Icmpenum is great for scanning networks when the firewall blocks ICMP Echo packets but fails to block Timestamp or Information packets.

The hping2 tool is notable because it contains a host of other features besides OS fingerprinting such as TCP, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), ICMP, and raw-IP ping protocols, traceroute mode, and the ability to send files between the source and target system.

SNMP Scanner allows you to scan a range or list of hosts performing ping, DNS, and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) queries.

Scan Types

SYN – A SYN or stealth scan is also called a half-open scan because it doesn’t complete the TCP three-way handshake. A hacker sends a SYN packet to the target; if a SYN/ACK frame is received back, then it’s assumed the target would complete the connect and the port is listening. If an RST is received back from the target, then it’s assumed the port isn’t active or is closed. The advantage of the SYN stealth scan is that fewer IDS systems log this as an attack or connection attempt.

XMAS – XMAS scans send a packet with the FIN, URG, and PSH flags set. If the port is open, there is no response; but if the port is closed, the target responds with a RST/ACK packet. XMAS scans work only on target systems that follow the RFC 793 implementation of TCP/IP and don’t work against any version of Windows.

FIN – A FIN scan is similar to an XMAS scan but sends a packet with just the FIN flag set. FIN scans receive the same response and have the same limitations as XMAS scans. FIN A FIN scan is similar to an XMAS scan but sends a packet with just the FIN flag set. FIN scans receive the same response and have the same limitations as XMAS scans.

NULL – A NULL scan is also similar to XMAS and FIN in its limitations and response, but it just sends a packet with no flags set.

IDLE – An IDLE scan uses a spoofed IP address to send a SYN packet to a target. Depending on the response, the port can be determined to be open or closed. IDLE scans determine port scan response by monitoring IP header sequence numbers.

 

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